Follow Us

Monday, July 22, 2019

         

   

          “But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb, and as she wept she stooped to look into the tomb; and she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had lain, one at the head and one at the feet. They said to her, ‘Woman, why are you weeping?’ She said to them, ‘Because they have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.’ Saying this, she turned round and saw Jesus standing, but she did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, ‘Woman, why are you weeping? Whom do you seek?’ Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, ‘Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.’ Jesus said to her, ‘Mary.’ She turned and said to him in Hebrew, ‘Rabboni!...

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Lord, have mercy!” (Frequent refrain in Byzantine Liturgy)

Isn’t it somewhat morbid, how often we repeat, in our church-services, “Lord, have mercy” (Κύριε, ἐλέησον)? It is, if we misunderstand the word “mercy” (ἔλεος, eleos), limiting it to what it means in today’s English, a “withholding of punishment.” But the term means much more in patristic usage. “Mercy” is in and from our “merciful” God, as His way of being, and His way of acting. With respect to us, “mercy” (eleos) is an overflowing of God’s goodness, spiritual riches, and salvation, abundantly upon us, if we are open to it, like a soothing oil (ἔλαιον, elaion). That’s why, traditionally, “oil” is seen as a symbol of God’s “mercy.”

So, when we say, “Lord, have mercy,” we are saying, Yes, have it Your way. Have mercy. We are open to...

Please reload

  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square

© Coffee with Sister Vassa Inc.

  • Odnoklassniki Social Icon
  • YouTube Reflection
  • Facebook Reflection
  • Vkontakte App Icon
  • Twitter Reflection
  • Google+ Reflection

Website designed by